Explore a timeline of key moments in our history

Read about the first Neighbourhood Houses in the world, how our organisation came to life, and how we have grown as a unified voice for the sector.

2021
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
2015
2012
2012
1997
1983
1973
1926
1891
1889
1884

2021

1997

QFCA becomes Neighbourhood Centres Queensland (NCQ)

Queensland Families & Communities Association (QFCA) members vote to change the name to Neighbourhood Centres Queensland (NCQ). NCQ continues to expand its capacity to grow the resourcing, recognition and impact of our sector.

2021

1997

Spotlight on Neighbourhood and Community Centres

Building on the work of the sector over the past 7 years, Minister Enoch forms a Strategic Repositioning Committee for Neighbourhood and Community Centres. A Parliamentary Inquiry into Loneliness and Social Isolation also highlights the vital role of neighbourhood centres in fostering participation, connection and belonging in communities. The International Federation of Settlement Houses Conference is hosted in Sydney, and Australia Neighbourhood Centres take centre stage.

2020

1997

The NCC Network grows its capacity

NCQ (then known as QFCA) successfully raises funding for an NCC focus at the Community Development QLD Conference, Communications and Digital Engagement, Disaster Resilience Projects and the design of a new Performance and Reporting Framework. Staffing capacity doubles and a General Manager is hired.

2019

1997

Researchers Demonstrate Value of Neighbourhood and Community Centres

Griffith University conducts two reports into Neighbourhood and Community Centres in Queensland, demonstrating the high value of the sector and proposal for investment.

2018

1997

Thriving Communities Grants Program

QFCA (NCQ) deliver the first Thriving Communities Grants program to centres and joins the Thriving Communities Leadership Group with other peak bodies. QFCA (NCQ) undertake a strategic plan process to secure future funding and development work for the sector.

2017

1997

Investment Management Standard

The Queensland government undertakes an Investment Management Standard (IMS) review of centres and funds a single Sector Development Officer for the QFCA (NCQ). A Community Connect Worker Trial is conducted in 12 centres.

2015

1997

Results Based Accountability Trial

QFCA (NCQ) works with Centres and State Government to trial a new reporting framework for Neighbourhood Centres. This framework is partially implemented.

2012

1997

CCFNAQ changes its name to Queensland Families and Communities Association (QFCA)

The Community Centres and Family Support Network Association Queensland (CCFNAQ) changes its name to the Queensland Families and Communities Association (QFCA). This is now Neighbourhood Centres Queensland.

2012

1997

Sector Rupture and Significant Funding Cuts

Significant changes disrupt the sector in 2012. Funding cuts are made to all Neighbourhood and Community Centres across Queensland, and there is total defunding of the CCFNAQ network. A Fair Work Equal Remuneration Order increase wages and the Carmody Report in 2013 moves Intensive Family Support to the community sector.

1997

1997

Networks Unite to form Queensland-wide Network

Smaller networks from across Queensland unite to form the Community Centres and Family Support Network Association Queensland (CCFNAQ), meeting for the first time in Cairns. State Government funds network meetings.

1983

1983

Queensland Practitioners and Centres form Support Networks

Sharing common values and working frameworks, Community Development Practitioners and Neighbourhood Centres form support networks around the state.

1973

1973

Funding for Neighbourhood Centres and Community Development initiatives in Australia

Under the Whitlam Government, the Australian Assistance Plan leads to Federal Funding towards Neighbourhood Centres and Community Development initiatives. This funding is developed alongside the Women’s Movement.

1926

1926

International Federation Established

The International Association of Settlements (now known as the International Federation of Settlements and Neighbourhood Centres) formed after the world’s first International Settlement House Conference was held in Toynbee Hall, London in 1922.

1891

1891

Settlement Houses in Australia

The Sydney University Women’s Society learns about the Settlement House Movement and begins work to establish a house in Darlington. The Settlement Neighbourhood Centre opened its doors in 1909 is still in operation today.

1889

1889

Jane Adams Establishes Hull House in Chicago

After visiting Toynbee Hall, Jane Addams established Hull House in Chicago, USA. Jane was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931 for establishing settlement houses, as well as her work in the areas of social work, women’s rights and world peace. Jane was inducted into the Chicago LGBT Hall of Fame in 2008.

1884

1884

World’s First Settlement House is Established in London

Canon Samuel Barnett and Henrietta Barnett establish Toynbee Hall, the world’s first settlement house, in the slums of London. With the help of University students, they began working with local people, seeking Residence, Research and Reform into areas of poverty.